Simplify QAing the js popup windows in your web app

QAing js popup windows in your web app is a pain in the ass. It’s easy to miss windows in obscure corners of your UI and can be hard to recreate the circumstances under which they’re shown, and the various states that determine how and when they appear. Automated js tests with a library like Qunit or Jasmine, while great, don’t really help when you need to make sure things look a certain way.

Fortunately, if you make a couple assumptions that I think hold true for a majority of web apps, we can simplify this testing process substantially.

https://github.com/lukeasrodgers/qa-js-popups

The Napoleon Dynamite problem

This is an old (If You Liked This, You’re Sure to Love That, Nov ’08) but good article from the New York Times that I read parts of online, but just read in its entirety in the NYT print version. Very interesting discussion of the ability of computers to predict our movie preferences, especially in the cases where computers seem to be able to discern some sort of hidden pattern, opaque to human interpretation, behind our preferences.

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Bot-mediated reality

Having just spent upwards of 25 hours in a car driving between Peterborough, Toronto, and Pukaskwa National Park, one of the ways we passed the time was listening to a variety of podcasts, including Philosophy Bites, CBC Ideas, and the Long Now Foundation’s Seminars About Long Term Thinking (SALT).

While SALT has hosted a bevy of fascinating and influential guests, including Craig Venter, Jimmy Wales, Francis Fukuyama, and Ray Kurzweil, Daemon: Bot-Mediated Reality by author and software engineer Daniel Suarez was one of the most interesting and thought-provoking (mp3 here).

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